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Friday, December 29, 2017

Friday Feature Film Review: American Psycho (Wall Street is Murder!) アメリカン・サイコ: ウォール街のダークコメディ

Wall Street is a tough career choice. In fact, it can be murder. Such is the story of Patrick Bateman, perfectly portrayed by Christian Bale (Batman Dark Knight fame). We find a new young generation of eager go getters in New York, who will to do whatever it takes to make a big bonus. It is a very narcissistic view of life and career, but was a true reflection of the times. Designer suits by Armani? Yes. The best tables at the best restaurants? Yes. Alpha male dominance seeking out model like girlfriends to be future possible trophy wives? Yes. Cash, youth and drive  combine for a turbo charged cocktail of ambition. 

It is all hedonistic of course and sadly lacking in personal values. Such is the world of our hero (anti-hero) Patrick Bateman. The son of another financier who plans on inheriting the family firm, Patrick is a trust fund child of privilege. An entitled prima donna type who has so much, he wonders what he really represent inside. An authentic product of top schools and the ivy league, they all seem to want to avoid that "Yale thing". What is that you ask, "being a closet homosexual doing a lot of cocaine, Oh that Yale thing!"


This is a dark comedy ultimately, (horrifically black) laughing at the shallow unimportant tiny details that could represent any real value in life or career. A business card is a great test of this alpha male crowd. "What do you think?" when presenting one's business card, is not really a question. It is a hoped for response of total envy, when presenting your refined & highly stylish business card. Bone and Silian Grail? so passe, Eggshell with Romalian Type, now that is the card to impress. Any audience member is surprised and partly revolted at the fierce rivalry over nothing of substance. However, for those involved, it is everything and not to be taken lightly. It could even be deadly.

Financial markets are black and white, driven by hard numbers. This leads to stress for those who do not lead or the ability to catch up. Intense deadly stress. This needs a release, and for our hero/anti-hero Patrick Bateman, this means murder, literally. It starts out with a homeless man and his dog in a back alley. What triggers this new stress release and who does it begin? you are shocked at the first killing but get used to the pattern soon after. You come to understand that the environment of New York financial markets, is toxic for young people with too much money taken on too quickly. This early high pressure to perform would kill you without some kind of release. The emptiness of those times crosses many activities like pornography, cocaine abuse, sexual amusement, tribe leadership, and endless trend setting culture. The goal of the story is to find comedy in the ridiculous nature of these lifestyle choices.

The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) There is a lot to learn about how to be long-term successful in finance, and no one answer will do. The more ways you can find to close big deals, and build relationships, the better. There is no single way to success, there are many, so learn them all.

2) The best financial leaders know how to make money, and keep doing what they do best, by observing key decision makers or possible patterns they often use. Knowing what buttons to press to close a deal or when to change with any new trend, is key to long term success.

3) When becoming a successful dealmaker, your emotional strength from family at home, may help you perform better on deals at work. Every person has a personal life, so the fulfilling it more, can help personal performance. It cannot be denied.

New York in the 1980s was an era that came and ended in the US along with the USSR cold war. Much of course depends on your personal definition of financial success, and the drive or core reason to pursue it in the first place. Beware to all those who may look at a financial career with less interest and more longing for the basics of life. Be warned of what you could really be feeling! A perfect movie choice for the holiday season when you have a bit of time to reflect on what is important. Highly recommended for all of the typical staff at an investment bank portrayed wonderfully by an excellent cast. So again, highly recommended! Happy New Year in 2018!


Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme.  Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!



If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.




    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, December 22, 2017

Friday Feature Film Review: The Family Man (Christmas Special!) : Nicholas Cage 天使のくれた時間 (クリスマススペシャル!) : ニコラス・ケイジ

It is Christmas eve, and the M&A transaction must still get done, a deal close meeting is set on Christmas day, but the staff are not happy. Nicholas Cage plays Jack Campbell, a Wall Street Rainmaker with everything that money can buy, except love from a family of his own. If only he made a different choice, his life may be different. A former girlfriend calls his office out of the blue, and a new twist in his normal life begins.

He soon wakes up in suburban New Jersey, not New York City. He is in bed with Tea Leoni, his former flame and current wife with screaming children running around. How is that possible? A parallel universe shows him what could have been. He cannot believe he is now married with 2 kids and working as a tire salesman, but that is the life he now has. 

This is really a movie that questions the morality challenge of money & career vs family fulfillment. It is a fun film that tries to bring a mirror to the materialism that keeps many within finance happy in their possessions, despite the emptiness of a surrounding growing family and the ties that bind. Is this attraction to things just a temporary part of any human's emotional evolution? It is a timeless question with no clear answer.

For many early in their financial career, yet to marry and yet to start a family, you will find the story basic. Those more senior than 30 or even 40, with the internal need to breed, will see this story in a very different light. It may make one uncomfortable with the lack of depth that money can bring in a career. You question what wealth is worth without the family love and bonding that grounds many in the world today. It may be a movie to avoid for those not quite sure on their life choice. Those who wonder if they have sacrificed personal relationships for careers of cash, may wonder if they still have made the best choice. 

The opening of this movie is around the Christmas holiday and the work vs life balance around deals at this time. All members may want the deal to happen, but not all have as much to lose at home. The emotional price that each member pays to work on that day varies enormously. The younger the member, the lower that price when single. Time is money shows itself to have another price tag for those with families at home. It can be a very high price.


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) There is a lot to learn about how to be a long-term successful rainmaker, and no one answer will do. The more motivations you can find to close deals, the better. There is no single way to success, there are many, so learn them all.

2) The best rainmakers know how to make money and keep doing what they do best by observing key decision makers and possible patterns. Knowing what buttons to press to get a decision is the EQ magic that many lack, not IQ, that only gets you to the table.

3) When becoming a successful rainmaker, your emotional strength from family at home, may help you perform on deals at work. Every person has a personal life, so the more empty or fulfilling it is, the more that can creep into personal performance. It cannot be denied.

Much of course depends on your personal definition of financial success, and the drive or core reason to pursue it in the first place. Beware to all those who may look at a financial career with less interest and more longing for the basics of life. Be warned of what you could really be feeling! A perfect movie choice for the Christmas holiday season. Highly recommended for all of the typical staff at an investment bank portrayed wonderfully by an excellent cast,  and deservedly so. Made back in 2000, is holds up well, and is still an amazing movie that is perfect for the holidays, highly recommended!


Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme.  Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!



If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.




    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, December 15, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: Empire : How Britain Made The Modern World: by Niall Ferguson 英国は近代的な世界を作った方法: ニーアル・ファーガソン

How did Britain, a small island nation come to run a global empire with 25% of the world under its control? How could this happen with a small population? It did so by adapting to various opportunities. It was a focused mind set. This is another well researched effort by Niall Ferguson, that brings together great sequences of financial history and global trade. The tale of how this all happened, is well described. It all fits together perfectly like a bespoke suit.

We learn that in the beginning, the UK was little more than a pirate nation attacking Spain. After taking over the island of Jamaica, they grew sugar, the new white gold needed in consumer markets. From this point on, the government coffers began to fill. Luckily, instead of spending, they reinvested much of the profits, and tried to expand well beyond the borders of Europe.

This is a wonderful collection of detail on how the British economy grew. For example, it looked at Holland, and its central and stock exchange, and then merged financial systems under William of Orange. This allowed the government to pay for a navy with private low cost bonds from the public. This even included Nathan Rothschild one of as its key investors. This growth pattern is also how the UK took over India. Despite its 400 million+ population, and a large standing Indian army that defeated the French for world trade domination, the UK prevailed. The author makes clear that business and trade decisions need to be financed. If you don't have that financing, you can't get those deals done. They are 2 sides of the same Empire's coin.

In contrast, if you only follow a king like France, a king that reneges on his debts from time to time, you pay higher interest rates. Higher rates that impact trade decisions France cannot afford. A nation's power is connected to its finances. Cecil Rhodes, famous for his Rhodes scholarship, uses cheap capital from the UK to build railroads in Southern Africa. In many ways, he can be seen as a private mercenary for the UK.  He had no small ego, and was a kind of land pirate if you will, wanting to take over the entire continent of Africa. By bringing the best weapons that money can pay for, and grabbing all real estate possible via military means for private investors, it worked. Much of Africa was taken over as colonies. He even created his own country named after himself, Rhodesia. 


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that impact any reader are:

1) Never be late with your state finances. The interest rate of a nation allows a country to grow and expand with trade. A high interest rate limits future growth.
2) A great observation by the UK on many new concepts was often followed up with quick action. Dutch financial innovation was quickly observed and emulated.
3) Winning and losing is very black and white. If you have the cash to pay for power, then use it. Much of English speaking Africa was due to this power play by the UK and its banking strength. Cash ultimately pays for the bullets.

There are many amazing stories like this across the history of the UK and its trade. They tie together well, and form a very interesting pattern. It shows why the world trades in the way it does, across many borders, especially using the English language. It all started by the UK, and recently extended by the USA. If Global Macro concepts interest you as much as myself, this will delight your mind. Given its color and clear approach to finance and history, this book is Highly Recommended!

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, December 8, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: More Money Than God! (Hedge Fund Kings) by Sebastian Mallaby ヘッジファンド ―投資家たちの野望と興亡: セバスチャン・マラビー

Global hedge funds pay big time bonuses. Bonus money big enough to become a billionaire. If you want to know the wealth & power around them, then this book is for you. Author Sebastian Mallaby, has amazing access to top-tier hedge fund players. He does some really incredible research into this exclusive"Titans of Finance" style of industry. The names and numbers really made sense and hooked me in. It is from a few years ago when the industry was near its peak, but it still ignites envious bonus envy for the majority of professionals who only dream of millions, not hundreds of millions come bonus day.

He did not waste my time or my money on this very rich in detail volume that really give you a full meal of satisfying insight. This was one of the most in depth books on hedge funds that I have ever come across. The direct quotes and input from the greatest managers of all-time make it work. Their views on many of the biggest trades the world has ever seen, was very educational in its remarkable detail. It is not one man's thoughts. It is one man's great collection of quotes from the traders who have made the big money. Those are the traders I want to hear it "direct from the gut" from anyway. The author stays out of the way, and allows you to absorb it all. 

You could feel that he not only developed excellent sources, but wished that you could have been there for the many of the conversations. For me, not a single page was drab. Every single line was worth my full attention. The wrap up on the industry in a big picture style worked for me too at the end. The author can really connect the dots perfectly. It many ways, he makes a good case that global investment banks were in fact, hedge fund partnerships themselves, but then got listed on various stock exchanges. A new wave of hedge funds will always come along to make money out of a never ending pattern of continuous market opportunities. Financial markets, like the sea itself, is never static. It is constantly moving in various directions.

The overall bigger picture is easy enough to understand, hedge funds evolve and adapt. The best ones grow and keep the kind of DNA that keeps on tinkering, like any inventor in a garage. They have to keep looking for the next new thing, new market, new strategy, new arbitrage, Bitcoin trade or whatever. Size matters, and institutional investors tend to look for asset size as a kind of comfort with hedge funds. Over time this can be flawed in many ways, but it is still an all too common practice. In a way, you get deja vu and hear that the old line, "nobody got fired for choosing IBM" , it works here too with large size hedge funds. 

On the surface, a very large and well established hedge fund with US$1BN or more in assets, seems safe as an investment. however, the financial size is not really a comfort in the end, as the performance can end quickly. It is the professionals, the real human capital, within any hedge fund that are the real assets being invested into. If the real IP, the brain power that these traders have, can figure out the next new thing in financial markets, then top tier performance follows for all investors. 

Ultimately, any hedge fund once successful, gets big. A few even get listed. and then make way for a newer wave of "Young Turks" to follow with the new new market sensation. Hedge funds really are about finding opportunities and the people behind them. That is where the big money is made, by seeing a new twist or tact, and creating profits by innovation around those new opportunities. These successes often come in waves and that reflect different strategies doing better or worse in different cycles.


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that impact any reader are:

1) Never be between a central bank making a wrong move and a full conviction hedge fund. Take George Soros and the Bank of England, it did not end well for the UK pound or the BOE. Always best to get out of the way when the big boys bet in size! 
2) A great observation was the comparison of Goldman Sachs when seeing their client Long Term Capital Management failing. It was like " a hyena feeding on a trapped but living antelope"! You gotta love that image of your helpful prime brokerage "partner"!
3) Winning and losing is very black and white. When a dejected trader says " I just want to kill myself" Hedge Fund founder Michael Steinhardt just asks "can I watch?". Such is the overall sympathy from deep within the hedge fund beast. 

The author Sebastian Mallaby takes us on this journey in a very detailed fashion. It is full of the kind of glitz and bling from the big personalities that feel they certainly earned their big bonuses. It all keeps many of these things in a kind of fantasy land for the many others lower down in the financial income scale. At least it keeps your appetite always wanting a little bit more. This was a great read and a great insight in the hedge fund world. This book is Highly Recommended!

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, December 1, 2017

Friday Feature Book Review: The King of Capital: Blackstone' s Rise to Power ブラックストーンのストーリー : デビッド・キャリー ジョン・モリス & 土方奈美

Blackstone is a name that means money and success. They run over US$30 billion is assets today, and this book does not disappoint in explaining how it got to that peak of power. However, like the tip of an iceberg, the image on the surface masks a harsh reality. It did not come quickly or easily, and rarely does. Billionaires like its founder Steve Schwarzman, are self-made, know how to work hard and take risks. It is ultimately pure and simple. The full background story is what the book explains very well. You get an authentic sense of the hard struggles and hurdles any new firm needs to overcome. Blackstone was no exception and paid its hard fought dues like many others. Nobody got rich by just "showing up" at the right time with the right product. The early days clearly were not easy or silky smooth.

This is not just about one founder, or one firm. In many ways, it explains the full picture of how LBO deals, and the billions in profits made from them, have grown over the last 40 years. If you wondered how the whole industry started, this is a great place to begin. We find out that private equity guru Steve Schwarzman, did not even study finance at Yale, but an arts degree! He started at DLJ and found that despite a lack of financial background, he had talent and was a quick study. 

After 3 years, he went for an MBA at Harvard, and then he perfected this talent for finance at Lehman Brothers, before starting Blackstone. Being an entrepreneur is not all about having a "big idea" one day to start a firm either, there was a logical clear process. One thing you learn about the head of Blackstone, is that he always tries to minimize risks, and follows a process. He takes calculated risks, and never just "throws the dice". We learn there is nothing he hates more than losing money. The most interesting aspect about Steve though is his creative side for finance. 

To close the most difficult deals he often needed to come up with "outside the box" style solutions. What you learn the most is that standard operating procedures with various LBO and M&A deals, grew faster because of Steve's efforts. Do you want to sell more junk bonds to finance the debt? OK, then offer bondholders reset caps, in case the bonds fall in value to ease their sale. Do you want to figure out the true price of real buyers? OK, then set up a blind sealed bid auction for takeovers. These are just two of the many LBO industry innovations that Steve came up with, the market did not. The market has grown to make them now standard. Most are basic procedures now, but in Blackstone's early days, were often new and innovative at the time.

If you can see KKR founder Henry Kravis, as the Bill Gates of corporate finance, Steve seems more like a Steve Jobs. He seems nicer too, highly innovative and different in type. Both of these titans are driven and very successful, but for different reasons. Blackstone as a firm was built a certain way, and it was built properly with a lot of innovation. The drive needed to be very successful in the business takes a lot of time and total persistence. High energy, financial creativity over new product types, and a bit of luck are also key. 


The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) Surprisingly, there is never a best time to start a business. No matter when you start, the beginning can take time before gaining any traction, even years.
2) Motivation seems to be a very strong motivator for many entrepreneurial actions to achieve wealth goals. The higher the motivation, the longer the time possible needed to achieve any ambitious goals.
3) Boot strapping startups with your own funds is fine, but success is not instant. When you pitch to borrow funds from financial institutions, it is never quick. Even for Blackstone, the early days of capital raising was long and difficult.

This is no overnight success story. There are no signs of champagne on day one. In the beginning, it was hand to mouth for 2 years and a difficult early road. Like many who spin out on their own, there is comfort in size and a reputation that clients prefer. Personal loyalty can be forgotten when a deal needs to be signed with a new firm. Major clients prefer an established name. When Blackstone started out, there was no welcome with open arms. New entrepreneurs learn this reality the hard way, and Steve was no different. He survived, built the firm into an industry legend, and lived long enough to enjoy the rewards. This book is Highly Recommended!

Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme. Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 50,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業50,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side and Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team.



    Tokyo                                                                Tokyo
             Mark  Pink                                                  Shinichi Nagasawa
      Direct + 81 3 3505 3891                                       Direct  +81 3 3505 3891
            Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                         Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, November 24, 2017

Friday Feature Movie Review: Wall Street: Michael Douglas: An Oliver Stone Film 1987 ウォール街: マイケル・ダグラス: オリバーストーンフィルム

 Greed is Good! This classic phrase has lived on to represent finance for decades since this Oliver Stone film was released in 1987. Some 30 years later, the movie still holds its own. Gordon Gekko, the main villain of this movie became the new anti-hero for a new generation within finance. He is played perfectly by Michael Douglas in arguably his best iconic role on film. Bud Fox, played by Charlie Sheen, gets to play every financial professional's dream.  To start out in the trenches and rise up to become a real "player" like "GG" (aka Gordon Gekko). At the time, that took around US$50-100 million dollars in cash. A large sum for sure, but the most important aspect being "liquid" with that fortune. Today I would assume that a billionaire would have to be the next new benchmark of financial success. The million dollar condo in Manhattan at the time was still seen as unattainable for many. Today a more expensive US$10-20 million dollar condo overlooking Central Park, like the One57 the billionaire building, may work best. Such would be the new address for the same sort of lifestyle choice allowed only for the exclusive few. The 1% at the top of the financial mountain.

The director's casting is also interesting as Martin Sheen, plays Carl Fox, Charlie Sheen & Bud Fox's father in the movie, not just in real life. On a side note, Martin is shown in hospital after the heart attack. In real life, that scene was shot right after Martin actually had a real heart attack. The tears for Charlie Sheen were said to be easy to muster as the memory was so recent. It was also the first scene shot with Martin Sheen, hence a limited amount of dialogue from a hospital bed. This may be one of Oliver Stone's best casting choices ever. Rarely does a father son presence on screen hit its mark so solidly with audiences.

Blue Star airlines where Carl Fox works in charge of the maintenance men, becomes important. It becomes a key stock target as the overfunded pension fund is too attractive a pot of gold to be left alone by GG. Another key scene is how to tip off the press by calling a key journalist. "Blue horse shoe loves Blue Star Airlines". Making such a risky call from a corporate desk on a recorded line seems odd today. Why not use a pay phone? At least it was not in an email.

The key point of the film is how information is the ultimate currency and path to riches. Sun Tzu and the "Art of War" is also introduced as a new Wall Street bible to learn strategy and insight from. What is legal, what is not, and what is in the grey zone of profitability. Legal viewpoints versus bendable rules that are "just a guide" is what the moral of the storyline tries to explain. Machiavelli does not get the last laugh. In this movie, "the end does not justify the means" it just gets a person in jail. The pursuit of money has a cost, nobody is above the law. That lesson rings very true to the viewer. Hedge Funds have been recent villains, and some founders who crossed those lines have gone to prison or paid big fines. There is now a big price to pay for bending any rules.


The Top 3 Takeaways from this movie that really impact any reader are:

1) Surprisingly, little has changed in the world of finance over 30 years. The young & hungry still have drive and ambition like before. The internal politics of any dealing room remain the same. Perhaps only testosterone may have come down a bit 3 decades later, not much of course but some, as quant geeks now rule the trading floor.
2) Technology may change over time, but new technology and its adoption is part of finance even today. New ways of communicating are constantly evolving without end.
3) The competitive nature of mind games and risk swagger have changed very little over 30 years. What cars or purchases may have different brands today, but the raw and burning drive to make it to financial independence has not changed at all over time. That drive to succeed it seems, is timeless.

Despite its age, only the electronic technology is dated. The people, their actions, and how they speak, all seem as contemporary today and it was in original release now 30 years ago. It was no lucky accident that this was the case. Oliver Stone's father was a career stockbroker and authentic tremendous care was taken in making sure that the script was very realistic. Not a single line seems out of place. Every attitude and snicker fits together perfectly like a bespoke suit. It still stands well against the test of time. Highly Recommended!

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