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Friday, September 30, 2016

Friday Feature Book Review: Other People's Money 富裕家族の富の物語 by Justin Cartwright ジャスティン・カートライト

Ultra HNWI families spend a lot! UBS and Credit Suisse have moved away from investment banking and refocused on asset management. Private Banking services for the 1% are the next clear trend globally. This is about a rich family and the lifestyle that they lead. OPM is a wealth management term for "Other People's Money" and is still used today.

The plot involves a very old bank, a family office, and the people involved with running that money, not just the deals themselves. The main focus is on the many up and coming rich generations that feel entitled to wealth made by their parents or grandparents. The view seems to be "is all in the family and I deserve all of it!" This is the main story line. 

It is pleasant light reading for lazy days by the beach in the south of France, where it is partly set, or on vacation elsewhere. What kind of characters work inside a very old private bank? What are their old money customers like? Much is revealed about the attitudes of High Net Worth clients, and their typical actions around entitlement. 

The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) There is a clear detachment with multi-generational HNWI families and their wealth. It is not about any return on capital, but more a return of capital with investments!

2) The south of France does seem to have a large number of British nationals spending away the family office wealth

3) Keeping hungry economically after financial success has never been easy to families to continue past second or third generations

What world do the super rich in Europe live in? That is what this book describes. It is ultimately a description of a recent period of time post Madoff, post Lehman, and the aftershocks that may be going on now that are being felt by private banks today. It may be fair to say that this book shows what is happening to families in Europe, and many families in China or Japan should take note. Lessons could be learned.

It is worth a read if that kind of fiction is what you seek. It is not a fast-paced hard core thriller about the famous financial "City" of London, England. I say this because it touches on the financial world, but does not really live or breath it. It is more of a pleasant fictional novel about people, who happen to be wealthy. I did not mind myself, but financial markets are basically just the scenery around the story, and not intrinsic to it. Highly Recommended!


Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme.  Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 45,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業45,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side or Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team in Tokyo.
                  
                              Mark  Pink                                             Shinichi Nagasawa
                      Tel + 81 3 3505 3891                                    Tel  +81 3 3505 3891
          Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                 Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com

Friday, September 16, 2016

Friday Feature Book Review: "How I Caused the Credit Crunch" : Tetsuya Ishikawa リーマンショックの物語: 石川哲也

It is now 8 years after Lehman Brothers went bankrupt. However, with the global bond markets at near zero rates, a new credit bubble is forming. Around 10 years ago, the world had a similar bubble with CDOs. This is a great look back at the Lehman Brothers crash and the Bear Stearns rescue by JP Morgan, now almost 8 years ago. This amusing novel gives a real insider's view on how the very frothy credit markets got there in the first place. 

For those who were just making a solid living in equities, fixed income and credit was a ticking time bomb. The author Tetsuya Ishikawa, is a Japanese British citizen, who worked at Goldman Sachs. He directly worked with collateralized debt obligations, better known as CDOs, that all blew up later on.

This is a great in-depth answer to those wondering about what a credit job in a global financial institution would have been like. This is a pleasant read if you like "The Wolf of Wall Street" style stories. It is full of slices of the excesses of money, booze, strippers, drugs and fine hotels, but not really strong in substance or market insight. 


The odd feeling you get by reading this book now though, is how few people seemed to have been aware of the clouds on the horizon. There may have been worry and concern over the amount of risk, but not enough to lose sleep over. The reality of the melt down turned out to be a much bigger event than anybody seemed to have anticipated.

The Top 3 Takeaways from this book that really impact any reader are:

1) There seemed to be no clear understanding by traders of how badly any abuse of credit via CDOs could end.

2) The focus on making as much money as possible personally, seemed to be the only religion at the time within Finance.

3) How interconnected the global world of finance really became, was not truly understood, only suspected.

You also learn more about how to survive within investment banking office politics, a very essential and much needed skill. It is critically important to know, how to make sure you can "get recognized" enough by the Managing Directors who write the checks, in order to get paid that mythical 7 figure income, but little else. 

It gives a curious account of one man's view of his role in a huge event, but is kept at the main character's human level. This is much less about how the big picture of the global credit crisis really came together in any clear form. When you are in the center of things, you often do not realize the size of the market all around you.

For anybody who has spent a few years in any front office role, the descriptions all ring true, and the author has clearly been there. However, there was nothing really new or too insightful, just great observations of a certain point in time. I found it similar to a trash magazine snack for the mind, a sugar rush equivalent. 

It was hardly a satisfying mental meal, but that was not the point. Like a fast food burger, it still satisfied a certain need with enough written details to quench a thirst for a financial story break over the weekend. Highly Recommended!


Please visit us for our Friday Feature Review where TMJ Partners will review books, movies, services and anything else with a financial theme.  Follow us now for our free weekly updates, just click hereThank you for reading and learning more about how money is made in finance!

If you are interested in Sales & Trading, Banking or FinTech focused roles in Asia or Japan then click here. Follow TMJ Partners on Twitter, the world's #1 recruiter on Twitter, over 45,000+ followers already have! click here! 

あなたアジア日本セールストレーディング,
バンキング、フィンテックの役割に興味がある場合は、こちらをクリックしてくださいティエムジェィパートナーズTwitterでフォローしてください 世界中のTwitter第1位の採用企業45,000以上のフォロワーが既に持っています!クリックしてください

For more Buy-Side or Sell-Side roles in Asia-Pacific, contact our TMJ Partners Japan & Asia Finance team in Tokyo.
                  
                              Mark  Pink                                             Shinichi Nagasawa
                      Tel + 81 3 3505 3891                                    Tel  +81 3 3505 3891
          Email pinkmark@tmjpartners.com                 Email nagasawa@tmjpartners.com